Kid Whisperer Nation Teacher Tips #86-90

Kid Whisperer Nation Teacher Tip #86

TEACHER/STUDENT VERBAL COMBAT Part II

DON’T LET THEM GET YOU OFF TRACK

Kids often try to take educators on a bird walk with random information shared for no reason. This is most often true when kids notice chaos already happening, commonly during large group settings that are already not well managed.

Simply stating “Thanks for sharing!” with a smile will render that manipulation non-functional. Even if the random conversation is not manipulative (more common with younger kids), this quick statement does not embarrass the student and is all a teacher has time for anyway.

 

Kid Whisperer Nation Teacher Tip #87

TEACHER/STUDENT VERBAL COMBAT Part III

SET A LIMIT ABOUT WHOM YOU TALK TO

Kids like to empower themselves by pulling attention with a behavior that isn’t terrible, but also isn’t really functional in a classroom or lunchroom either. ONE TIME, let kids know how you live your life:

“I talk to students who are silently raising their hands.”

From then on, when kids grab or yell out at educators or cafeteria staff, simply say the following exactly as I have written it here:

“Who do I talk to?

AND WALK AWAY.

 

Kid Whisperer Nation Teacher Tip #88

TEACHER/STUDENT VERBAL COMBAT Part IV

SET A LIMIT ABOUT TO WHOM YOU TALK, PART II

Certain kids like to show off by being obnoxious to adults, but they are often smart enough to not be so rude that their behavior requires a consequence. This is most common during times of the day that are a bit more chaotic, like lunch or recess. In order to retain your calm authority during these moments, use empathy, a limit-setting statement, and then walk away.

Kid: Hey, Mr. Boogety!

Kid Whisperer: Oh, man. I only talk to kids who are being nice.
(Kid Whisperer walks away.)

 

Kid Whisperer Nation Teacher Tip #89

TEACHER/STUDENT VERBAL COMBAT Part V

SET A LIMIT ABOUT TO WHOM YOU TALK PART III

I always find it to be amazing, when traveling throughout the country and visiting schools, how often students will physically grab adults, either as they are walking by or as the teacher starts to walk away after a conversation. This is particularly true in the lunchroom. Here’s something for that:

When a student grabs onto you, gently but firmly remove the student’s hand and say:

“Oh, man. I talk to people who have their hands to themselves.”

If the student grabs out of the blue, and not in the middle of a conversation, I add “…and are sitting silently with their hands up.”

 

Kid Whisperer Nation Teacher Tip #90

EFFECTIVE LUNCHROOM STRATEGIES PART I

ADULTS CAN EITHER BE EDUCATORS OR WAITERS IN THE LUNCHROOM… NOT BOTH
Adults cannot open, stir, or peel anything for students in the lunchroom and do all of the relationship building, preventive interventions, and consequences necessary to create a safe calm, lunch experience for students at the same time. One letter at the beginning of the year needs to be sent home telling parents that they may only send food that can be opened by their child. If the student can’t open or peel something, someone else (a student) at the table will be able to open it.